Milestone 3 convectors PowerIdea 2

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1. Include a diverse audience: The power of crowdsourcing lies in its ability to systematically engage a large, diverse group of people in collaborative problem solving. The shift toward a collaborative model requires an investment in technology and a commitment to a new employee engagement process. It means commitments from the CEO and a supporting cast of leaders across the organization. “Companies give innovation a lot of ‘airtime’ but not enough ‘dollar time,’” said Vineet Nayar, Vice Chairman and CEO of India’s HCL Technologies. “At HCL, we put innovation on our balance sheet. We innovate on behalf of our customers and participate with them in the risk associated with innovation. When innovation results in a new revenue stream for them, we share in it. We have this arrangement now with several customers.”


2. Provide a clear purpose: To ensure that crowdsourcing does not descend into chaos when a plethora of voices spin off topic, you should provide a specific challenge for the company. For instance, ask employees to identify a new greentech product that could generate a specific dollar amount in revenue over a defined period. An explicit purpose should give employees a catalyst, a community, and an outlet to unlock untapped innovation.

“At HCL, we put innovation on our balance sheet. We innovate on behalf of our customers and participate with them in the risk associated with innovation. When innovation results in a new revenue stream for them, we share in it. We have this arrangement now with several customers."

3. Motivate to participate. While employees are typically enthusiastic about providing input for new initiatives, there is no guarantee of universal participation. In fact, companies are likely to face the hurdle often described as the 90-9-1 principle. This tenet, premised on Web-usage statistics from popular community sites including YouTube, describes participation in online content creation: 90% of the audience will access content without participating, 9% will edit or modify content, and only 1% will create content. Participation is more likely to be self-generating in companies that have a trusting environment in which employees are engaged and encouraged to contribute.