WinterMilestone 2 freddiev

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Attend a Panel to Hear from Workers and Requesters

Deliverable

Some of the most interesting things I had caught during the panel was how workers utilize different resources in order to facilitate their job. For example, some workers have scripts that run automatically in order to tell them when certain types of HITs are being posted. This is particularly useful in that they don't have to search all day and try to catch different HITs by themselves; plus, they can pick out tasks that they are comfortable completing.

The problem with the posting of HITs and being notified of HITs is that, if, like many workers, one needs to jump right on a task and start working on it, it might be at an inconvenient time; they could be eating, working on something else or be spending time with family. In this way, it sort of interferes with their everyday lives and so they never really have a work "schedule".

There is also no face to face interaction. It just seems like, as a requester, someone magically appears and takes care of work for you, but not even a person. It seems like a bot almost.

Reading Others' Insights

Worker perspective: Being a Turker

1) What observations about workers can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

The two main things I observed had to do with identity, and making money. People can go around and accept jobs and complete them and be completely unknown/anonymous. They can work for whoever they want whenever they want with no expectations. On the other hand, this can lead to criticism because people can easily dispute/reject what workers have done. The other main thing is making money. A lot of people are trying to make money off to the side, but it can be difficult because they have a full-time job and some tasks might only be available at times when their full-time job requires attention. In contrast, some people are trying to make a living off of this, and it can be difficult because of how obscure the entire system seems to be.

2) What observations about requesters can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

Requesters can very easily accept or reject work people have spent time doing, and that can cause frustration for workers especially if they spend hours trying to complete something only to have it rejected with no reasoning. Also, requesters seem to think that workers are having fun doing work, when in reality most of them are just trying to make money and that's it.

Worker perspective: Turkopticon

1) What observations about workers can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

Workers are taking a huge risk when they take on jobs in that they can easily be rejected after spending hours on doing work; in the sense that the requester holds out on wages. Workers also seem to be on the harsh side of performance; they can be penalized for certain behaviors but requesters cannot.

2) What observations about requesters can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

Requesters are on the easier side of things. They have the most power/influence because they are the ones paying people to do work. They don't have to reply to anyone, don't have to accept any work, aren't penalized for bad behavior, etc etc. Not to mention the fact that there are significantly more workers than requesters. Someone putting up tasks basically have some sort of control over hundreds of people trying to make money.

Requester perspective: Crowdsourcing User Studies with Mechanical Turk

1) What observations about workers can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

It seems as though workers put more effort into doing longer, more intensive tasks, rather than focusing on the small simple ones. This could be problematic in that they spend hours doing one task, but get no positive result at the end; but the payoff could be potentially better if they do end up with a positive result.

2) What observations about requesters can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

One thing that stood out to me was that requesters cannot control the workers in terms of their work environment; it's very open ended.

Requester perspective: The Need for Standardization in Crowdsourcing

1) What observations about workers can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.


2) What observations about requesters can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

Both perspectives: A Plea to Amazon: Fix Mechanical Turk

1) What observations about workers can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

Good workers need to get more recognition/better pay than bad ones, and the entire interface/interaction system needs to be improved in order to facilitate work and better the chances of getting paid.

2) What observations about requesters can you draw from the readings? Include any that may be are strongly implied but not explicit.

Requesters don't have a restriction on payment; they don't have to pay at a certain time and aren't obligated to pay anyone for anything they've done. They can also get spammed by bad/inexperienced people if they end up posting a lot of HITs

Do Needfinding by Browsing MTurk-related forums, blogs, Reddit, etc

List out the observations you made while doing your fieldwork. Links to examples (posts / threads) would be extremely helpful.

Synthesize the Needs You Found

List out your most salient and interesting needs for workers, and for requesters. Please back up each one with evidence: at least one observation, and ideally an interpretation as well.

Worker Needs

A set of bullet points summarizing the needs of workers.

  • Workers need a better way to communicate with requester
  • They need a better "schedule" of some sort in order to reduce conflicts with their work and personal life
  • Workers need a way to be able to review requester behavior and also not be so harshly criticized if requester communication is poor and as a result the worker produces unwanted work

Requester Needs

A set of bullet points summarizing the needs of requesters.

  • Requester need to have more faith in the workers and not criticize so harshly
  • Requesters need to communicate better with workers in order to make their lives easier but also so that the requester gets exactly what they want
  • They also need a way to avoid spammy/inexperienced workers